Nitrogen-fixing beauties

Legume flowers burst forth after a timely rain, making late summer forest floor look like spring.

Hatchlings

There’s a trio of waist-high holly bushes on the property that never seem to fill out; never seem to outgrow the term “misshapen.” Over the years we began to realize that all the pruning in the world wouldn’t help them achieve any sort of suburban landscape symmetry. Why? Because the deer do all the trimming, browsing tender leaves and leaving discards all over the front porch.  Earlier this month, we found the hollies supported another life — a tiny cup of tightly woven pine needles bearing three marble sized-eggs. Last night, we discovered the eggs had given way to tiny birds. Blind and almost featherless with their oversized yellow beaks straining upward for motherly fare.

Baby birds in nest.
Cupful of babies — Tiny birds wait on mom to bring some breakfast. Taken June 14, 2015.
Three eggs in a nest.
Three eggs carrying precious life — taken June 6, 2015.

Dogwoods

Spring has finally loosed all its charms here in the Arkansas Ouachitas. Even the dogwoods have caught up — blooming just in time for Easter.

Burst of pink

This summer has been rather rainy here on the eastern side of the Arkansas Ouachitas. The abundant rain and temperate, um, temperatures, may account for the steady parade of wildflowers we’ve not seen before. These pinks popped up last weekend. Don’t know what they are yet (possibly smooth phlox?), but they sure stand out among the greenery.

pink flowers in grass

Group of pink flowers in grass.
Did not see him while composing this image, but there appears to be a little fishing spider on the blade of grass on the right edge of the picture.

Weekly photo challenge: On the move

This week’s challenge is On the Move. Here’s what’s been moving in the trees.

Bee among the peach blossoms.
BUZZIN’ — Honey bee buzzing peach blossoms in April. Faster than my shutter, the motion blur is all his.
Yellow butterfly.
IN FLIGHT – Yellow swallowtail zooms through the Ouachita woods. These big-winged creatures can really speed. Hard to pan and follow.

 

 

 

Other movement you might like:

 

Flying phlox

The bright pink of these wild phlox caught my eye while wandering around the deer trails in the Ouachita (pronounced “WASH’-ih-taw”) Mountains. An incoming storm system brought some big winds from the south and even at ground level (at 700 feet or so), these phlox were flying.

wind blown phlox
WIND BLOWN — Plenty of wind at ground level when you grow at 700 feet.

Really red

Mother Nature is  throwing reds into the increasingly green landscape here in the Arkansas Ouachita Mountains.

Ouachita bouquet

The eastern Arkansas Ouachita Mountains have been generous this spring.