How to feed your whistlepig

So, you’re thinking about a whistlepig of your own? How do you feed her? What do you feed her? How much do you feed her? Well, Tamara and Jack, close personal friends and culinarians for Perry County Blossom, have done the math for you. (They’re PhDs. They’re good at math.)  Here’s their grocery list for the last five months:

  • 35 heads of cabbage.
  • 40 pounds of carrots.
  • 300 pieces of fruit (apples, pears, nectarines, etc.).
  • 150 cups of oatmeal.
  • Extra cucumbers, vegetable scraps, tomatoes from the home garden.
  • Uncounted pounds of salted peanuts in the shell.

Remember, the next time you hear, “Mom! Dad! Can WE have whistlepig?” You have some concrete statistics to show where their allowance will be spent right after your “only- if-you-take-care-of-her” riposte.

Previous posts on our winter/spring prognosticator:

Groundhog eating a carrot.
Nom nom nom nom nom as carrots, apples and peanuts disappear.  (Photo by Jack)

Blossom, Punxsutawney Phil and persimmon prognostication

A lot of America appears to be suffering from winter fatigue, cabin fever or related disorders that result from a prolonged battle against cold, snow, snirt, ice, power outages and indignant derriere landings thanks to any number of slick frozen water combinations.

This headline from a CBS story today says it all: The calendar may say spring, but the forecast says snow.

The winter weariness seems to have reached serious proportions in Butler County, Ohio, where there’s an indictment with Punxsutawney Phil’s name on it:

3-24-Indictment
Where’s Perry Mason when you need him?

When it comes to whistlepig prognosticators, our money is on Perry County Blossom, who this year predicted six more weeks of winter. Blossom spokescouple Jack and Tamara also report that Blossom has had a litter.  We hope to have a new photo or two of Blossom as spring progresses and she can leave her den.

And one more note about folkways forecasting. It seems the persimmon seeds were right this year. The wet winter has been welcome in the half of Arkansas still in drought.