Linear drama

The underbelly of this fungus was so visually intriguing. Anybody know what kind it is?

1-25-2017 Fungus 2-edit.jpg
These are beautiful in the way engravings are beautiful — how the lines describe the contours and give dimension and drama to the image. 

 

1-25-2017 Fungus 3.jpg1-25-2017 Fungus Gills TIght.jpg

 

Big and beautiful

This big and beautiful polyphemus moth was fluttering around the parking lot at work on Friday. Of course I had to take his portrait. More detailed shots of this lovely fellow are below.

Big moth on parking lot stripe.
Big moth — This fellow measured nearly 6 inches from tip to tip.
Closeup of moth wing markings.
A tight shot of the beautiful markings on the moth’s wings.
Closeup of antennae.
A closeup of the polyphemus’ antennae, which looks like a skeletonized leaf.

Mudface

There’s nothing like a stroll around the office before the work day begins to clear the mind, enjoy the sub 100-degree temperatures and find delightful surprises like this massive 2-inch-plus beetle. (not to mention four whole cents in two days!)

GIANT –When you’re this big, it’s OK to have a dirty face. 

 

Another redhead in the parking lot*

Theparking lots between the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and the Cooperative Extension  Service headquarters are ringed with a mix of old, tall hardwoods and pines that rise to somewhere in the 50-70 foot range. This thin forest is home to an abundance of life including hawks, raccoons and coyotes. There are several types of woodpeckers too; red-bellied, pileated and this fellow, the red-headed woodpecker.

ON HIGH — Red-headed woodpecker enjoys the view from atop a large, leafless pine tree.

(*The earlier redhead in the parking lot was a spectacular red maple)

The higher ed hawk

It’s not uncommon for the thrum of traffic along South University Avenue in Little Rock to pierced by the shriek of a hawk. Folks who work at the University of Arkansas-Little Rock and the adjacent extension service offices have observed a female hawk nesting in the same place for at least five years. Her landings near high office windows or railings are a delight to watch.  It’s also a relief to her fans that despite the rise of new campus buildings and the demise of some of the higher pines, she continues to make the university her home.

Below, some hawk shots taken during morning strolls around campus.

WATCHING — Hawk perches some 60 feet above campus.
WAITING — Juvenile red-tailed hawk waits out the harassment doled out by blue jays, catbirds and other smaller birds. It eventually flew back toward its nest.
HAWK’S NEST — Described as being “big as a La-Z-Boy.”