When moisture from the warm Gulf of Mexico meets cold air from the north and west, severe thunderstorms are likely. Sometimes, they give birth to tornadoes. One such storm cropped up mid-afternoon today.  Here on Round Mountain, we had a front row seat as the wall cloud moved eastward, pelting us with pea-sized hail and cracking the sky with frequent lightning.

The National Weather Service is still receiving damage reports. Some 15,000 people are reported without power, with trees down, one car overturned with children inside (the children were rescued and reported to be OK, but probably scared out of their wits), and damage to buildings downtown.

 

Wall cloud
The rain-free area to the left precedes what was turning into a wall cloud (dark area to the right) that produced a tornado that tracked some 15 miles through Little Rock on Oct. 24.
Lightning
A stroke of lightning bolts through the sky as the storm intensifies.
Spectacular sunset between storms
Spectacular sunset between storms, as we await a second storm system that has already produced a tornado in SW Arkansas.
Weather radar
Red boxes for tornado warnings and yellow boxes for severe thunderstorms track like footprints across Texas and Arkansas.

 

 

 

 

 

One thought on “Tornado warning

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s