Curious Georgette

There’s one female hummingbird who seems to have made the connection between the people inside the house and the nectar in the feeders. When the feeder is dry, she hovers in front of the windows. Is she signalling us? Or is she checking to see if anyone is coming toward the deck?

Tonight, as I quietly moved to the deck to photograph a deer grazing below among the sunchokes and overgrown poke, this female hummingbird buzzed right up to the lens. Did not have the flash on for this just-before-sunset sequence, but that’s just as well — she might have been startled and a her curiosity dashed.

Hummingbird gets her closeup.
Is she curious, or just making sure the photographer catches her best side?

Gateway Arch

Young niece Rachel is developing quite an eye for photography.  A couple of shots from her trip to St. Louis.

Looking up at Gateway Arch
Looking up at the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. (iPhone photo)
Shadow of Gateway Arch
The shadow of a monument. Looking down from the top of the arch. (iPhone photo)

Post No. 100

It’s a good day for post No. 100. A quick 15-minute amble around the house and yard produced a pint of sweat and a bushel of frames. A sampling from this morning’s walk n’ shoot.

Ready to Fly

Seed head parachutes await the wind
Colt's foot seedhead parachutes await the wind. (photo illustration)

Yellow.

Yellow butterfly on  leaf
It's hard not to be captivated by colors in the Ouachita Mountains. You just have to look closely.

Dill.

Gray butterfly on yellow dill blossoms.
This gray butterfly, and another insect pollinator below, make a stop at the volunteer dill. This is the second straight year for volunteer dill, right next to the 6-foot volunteer sunflowers.

Shaded.

Skipper resting on leaves
This butterfly rests in the shade among wild blackberries.

Orange you glad I didn’t say banana?

Orange bug with zebra striped legs
His mother dresses him funny.

On a dime

There’s a good reason we shake out our shoes before wearing them.  This striped bark scorpion passed onto the big rock pile in the sky long before it reached adulthood. It’s not unusual to find adults in the house, walking the bathroom floor in their odd, tank-like way, only to perish under the force of a rolled up issue of Wine Spectator.

Baby scorpion on a dime
Bark scorpion fits on a dime.
Scorpion on a dime, facing front

Two baby scorpions
Found months apart.
From pincers to stinger, this tiny scorpion is as complete as a 2-inch adult.